Friday Favorites – Daredevil: Dark Nights May 30, 2014 – Posted in: Blog, Featured Columns, Friday Favorites

 

As a life-long DD fan, I”m thrilled to see horn head in two monthly books! Does this launch him into the “A List” of Marvel heroes?

 

As a life-long DD fan, I"m thrilled to see horn head in two monthly books! Does this launch him into the "A List" of Marvel heroes?

As a life-long DD fan, I”m thrilled to see horn head in two monthly books! Does this launch him into the “A List” of Marvel heroes?

 

Daredevil: Dark Nights is a new anthology series (separate from the current series’ continuity).  It debuts with a 3-issue story written, penciled and inked Lee Weeks, with color by Lee Loughridge.  They say everyone has one truly great story in them.  Perhaps this is Lee’s.  With over 30 years experience drawing comics, this is his first time behind the typewriter and he’s nailed it.  He knows the character of Daredevil inside and out and he has crafted a perfect Daredevil tale in every way.

I started “Friday Favorites” with the story that cemented what a hero, in particular Daredevil, was to me (Daredevil #163).  Always do what’s right and never give up.  Even when everything and everyone says you can’t do it – never give up.

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Many people compare Daredevil to Batman.  They say Daredevil is just a more literal take on the idea of Batman (he is blind and has sonar/radar after all), but it’s his stubborn refusal to ever give in which makes Daredevil his own character.  Batman was born out of hatred, anger and a desire for revenge.  Daredevil wants to live up to his father’s example.  Never giving in and never giving up cost Jack Murdock his life – and he knew it would.  He’d never been much of a man, not much of a fighter and likely not the best father, but he knew this was one thing he could do for his son – set an example, and it’s an example the very best Daredevil stories lean on.  It gets down the very very essence of what the Daredevil character represents.

Lee Weeks gets that and we’re lucky he does.  He left an awfully high bar for the series to reach toward.

 

 

 

 

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