Mythology Trading Cards April 18, 2012 – Posted in: Blog

Richard Cox completed 25 sketch cards (in both color and greyscale) and a base card for Perna Studios’ Classic Mythology trading card set.

The set focuses on 6 timeless Classic Mythologies that we have all come to love and enjoy during our lifetime. The mythologies spotlighted in this set are Greek, Norse, Egyptian, Celtic, Japanese and Hindu. Most descriptions are from Wikipedia.

Here they all are!

Keep in mind these are 2×3 sketch cards!  Copic markers, colored pencil, & white ink on cardstock.

 

In Norse mythology, Huginn (from Old Norse “thought”) and Muninn (Old Norse “memory” or “mind”) are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world, Midgard, and bring the god Odin information.

In Greek mythology, Charon or Kharon (English pronunciation: /ˈkɛərɒn/, /ˈkɛərən/; Greek Χάρων) is the ferryman of Hades who carries souls of the newly deceased across the rivers Styx and Acheron that divided the world of the living from the world of the dead. A coin to pay Charon for passage, usually an obolus or danake, was sometimes placed in or on the mouth of a dead person. Some authors say that those who could not pay the fee, or those whose bodies were left unburied, had to wander the shores for one hundred years.

Ame-no-Uzume-no-mikoto (天宇受売命, 天鈿女命?) is the goddess of dawn, mirth and revelry in the Shinto religion of Japan, and the wife of fellow-god Sarutahiko Ōkami. She famously relates to the tale of the missing sun deity, Amaterasu Omikami.

The Great Hag

The Erinyes are you basic Greek triple goddesses of vengeance. With a really f’d up birth story (via Wikipedia for convenience): When the Titan Cronus castrated his father Uranus and threw his genitalia into the sea, the Erinyes emerged from the drops of blood, while Aphrodite was born from the crests of seafoam. I’ll let you psychoanalyze THAT to your heart’s content.

Circe (ˈsɜrsiː/; Greek Κίρκη Kírkē “falcon”) is a minor goddess of magic (or sometimes a nymph, witch, enchantress or sorceress), described in Homer’s Odyssey as “The loveliest of all immortals”, living on the island of Aeaea, famous for her part in the adventures of Odysseus. In Homer’s Odyssey, Circe is described as living in a mansion that stands in the middle of a clearing in a dense wood. Around the house prowled strangely docile lions and wolves, the drugged victims of her magic; they were not dangerous, and fawned on all newcomers.

Amaterasu (天照?), Amaterasu-ōmikami (天照大神/天照大御神?) or Ōhirume-no-muchi-no-kami (大日孁貴神?) is a part of the Japanese myth cycle and also a major deity of the Shinto religion. She is the goddess of the sun, but also of the universe. The name Amaterasu derived from Amateru meaning “shining in heaven.” The meaning of her whole name, Amaterasu-ōmikami, is “the great august kami (god) who shines in the heaven”.

Frigg (sometimes anglicized as Frigga) is a major goddess in Norse paganism. She is said to be the wife of Odin, and is the “foremost among the goddesses” and the queen of Asgard. Frigg is described as the only one other than Odin who is permitted to sit on his high seat Hlidskjalf and look out over the universe.

Susanoo (須佐之男 (スサノオ) romanized as Susano-o, Susa-no-O and Susanowo?) is the Shinto god of the sea and storms. Basically, he got Orochi drunk and chopped him to bits. Yeah, I know.

Typhon, also Typhoeus, Typhaon or Typhos was… the most deadly monster of Greek mythology. He was known as the Father of all monsters. Typhon was described… as the largest and most fearsome of all creatures. His human upper half reached as high as the stars. His hands reached east and west and, instead of a human head, he had a hundred dragon heads; some however depict him as having a human head and the dragon heads being attached to his hands instead of fingers. He was feared even by the mighty gods. His bottom half was gigantic viper coils that could reach the top of his head when stretched out and made a hissing noise. His whole body was covered in wings, and fire flashed from his eyes. So yeah. Kind of a badass.

In Greek mythology, a harpy (“snatcher”, from Latin: harpeia, originating in Greek: ἅρπυια, harpūia) was one of the winged spirits best known for constantly stealing all food from Phineas. The literal meaning of the word seems to be “that which snatches” as it comes from the ancient Greek word harpazein (ἁρπάζειν), which means “to snatch”.

The Morrígan is a goddess of battle, strife, and sovereignty. She sometimes appears in the form of a crow, flying above the warriors, and in the Ulster cycle she also takes the form of an eel, a wolf and a cow. She is generally considered a war deity comparable with the Germanic Valkyries, although her association with a cow may also suggest a role connected with wealth and the land.

According to the Prose Edda, Odin took Loki’s three children, Fenrisúlfr, Hel and Jörmungand, and tossed Jörmungand into the great ocean that encircles Midgard. The serpent grew so large that he was able to surround the Earth and grasp his own tail. When he lets go, the world will end.

Nom nom nom! In the most classic and well known version of Greek mythology, Cronus or Kronos (Ancient Greek: Κρόνος, Krónos) was the leader and the youngest of the first generation of Titans, divine descendants of Gaia, the earth, and Uranus, the sky. He overthrew his father and ruled during the mythological Golden Age, until he was overthrown by his own son, Zeus and imprisoned in Tartarus.

Cerberus was the offspring of Echidna, a hybrid half-woman and half-serpent, and Typhon, a fire-breathing giant whom even the Olympian gods feared. The common depiction of Cerberus in Greek mythology and art is as having three heads. In most works the three-heads each respectively see and represent the past, the present, and the future, while other sources suggest the heads represent birth, youth, and old age. Each of Cerberus’ heads is said to have an appetite only for live meat and thus allow only the spirits of the dead to freely enter the underworld, but allow none to leave.

Raijin is a god of lightning, thunder and storms in the Shinto religion and in Japanese mythology. His name is derived from the Japanese words rai (雷, meaning ‘thunder’) and shin (神, ‘god’). He is typically depicted as a demon beating drums to create thunder, usually with the symbol tomoe drawn on the drums.

In Greek mythology Medusa (Greek: Μέδουσα (Médousa), “guardian, protectress”) was a Gorgon, a chthonic monster, and a daughter ofPhorcys and Ceto. The author Hyginus, (Fabulae, 151) interposes a generation and gives Medusa another chthonic pair as parents. Gazing directly upon her would turn onlookers to stone. She was beheaded by the hero Perseus, who thereafter used her head as a weapon until he gave it to the goddess Athena to place on her shield. In classical antiquity the image of the head of Medusa appeared in the evil-averting device known as the Gorgoneion.

Bastet is the name commonly used by scholars today to refer to a feline goddess of ancient Egyptian religion who was worshipped at least since the Second Dynasty. Her name is also spelled Bast, Baast, Ubasti and Baset.

Jörmungand again…far too cool to just draw once!

As soon as Theseus entered the Labyrinth, he tied one end of the ball of string to the door post and brandished his sword which he had kept hidden from the guards inside his tunic. Theseus followed Daedalus’ instructions given to Ariadne; go forwards, always down and never left or right. Theseus came to the heart of the Labyrinth and also upon the sleeping Minotaur. The beast awoke and a tremendous fight then occurred. Theseus overpowered the Minotaur with his strength and stabbed the beast in the throat with his sword (according to one scholium on Pindar’s Fifth Nemean Ode, Theseus strangled it).

Ryūjin or Ryōjin (龍神 “dragon god”), also known as Ōwatatsumi, was the tutelary deity of the sea in Japanese mythology. This Japanese dragon symbolized the power of the ocean, had a large mouth, and was able to transform into a human shape. Ryūjin lived in Ryūgū-jō, his palace under the sea built out of red and white coral, from where he controlled the tides with magical tide jewels.

Pegasus (Greek: Πήγασος, Pegasos, Latin Pegasus) is one of the best known fantastical as well as mythological creatures in Greek mythology. He is a winged divine horse, usually depicted as white in color. He was sired by Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and foaled by the Gorgon Medusa. He was the brother of Chrysaor, born at a single birthing when his mother was decapitated by Perseus. Greco-Roman poets write about his ascent to heaven after his birth and his obeisance to Zeus, king of the gods, who instructed him to bring lightning and thunder from Olympus. Friend of the Muses, Pegasus is the creator of Hippocrene, the fountain on Mt. Helicon.

Yamata no Orochi (八岐の大蛇?, lit. “8-branched giant snake”) or Orochi, translated as the Eight-Forked Serpent in English, is a legendary 8-headed and 8-tailed Japanese dragon that was slain by the Shinto storm-god Susanoo.

In Greek religion and mythology, Athena or Athene (əˈθiːnə/ or /əˈθiːniː/; Attic: Ἀθηνᾶ, Athēnā or Ἀθηναία, Athēnaia; Epic: Ἀθηναίη, Athēnaiē; Ionic: Ἀθήνη, Athēnē; Doric: Ἀθάνα, Athana), also referred to as Pallas Athena/Athene (ˈpæləs/; Παλλὰς Ἀθηνᾶ; Παλλὰς Ἀθήνη), is the goddess of wisdom, courage, inspiration, civilization, law and justice, just warfare, mathematics, strength, strategy, the arts, crafts, and skill.

 

 

 

 

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